Early and Middle Adulthood | Boundless Psychology - adult cognitive developmental theory

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adult cognitive developmental theory - Cognitive Development in Adulthood


Adult Cognitive Development from a Lifespan Developmental Perspective1 K. Warner Schaie Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington Abstract: A fairly concise lifespan perspective is presented on what some would call normal cognitive aging. Apr 20, 2011 · In the adult learning process, this theory insists on the cognitive development of the learners. The content of learning must not be too difficult for the learners to understand. Adults easily learn how to learn by themselves and the learning model used should facilitate their self-directed learning.Author: Eadulteducation.

Since Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, other developmental psychologists have suggested a fifth stage of cognitive development, known as postformal operational thinking. Early adulthood is a time of relativistic thinking, in which young people begin to become aware of more complexities in life. Piaget's theory of cognitive development is a comprehensive theory about the nature and development of human intelligence. It was first created by the Swiss developmental psychologist Jean Piaget. The theory deals with the nature of knowledge itself and how humans gradually come to acquire, construct, and use it. Piaget's theory is mainly known as a developmental stage theory. Piaget "was .

Jun 12, 2014 · Levinson's Theory. Psychologist Daniel Levinson developed a comprehensive theory of adult development, referred to as the Seasons of Life theory, which identified stages and growth that occur well into the adult years. His theory is comprised of sequence-like stages. Each stage is shaped by an event or action that leads into the next stage. Jul 23, 2014 · Erikson’s psychosocial theory of development considers the impact of external factors, parents and society on personality development from childhood to adulthood. According to Erikson’s theory, every person must pass through a series of eight interrelated stages over the entire life cycle [2].